Best engine mount for 206?

Looking to mount 206 on otk chassis, looking to know what’s the best mount out there.

I love my 4 stroke ordenthal. I have used it on an older birel and now on my new atomica. Plenty of adjustability. And super easy changes and chain adjustments.

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I am a fan of the jtp mount. It’s the only one briggs recommends if you need to offset the engine at all. It has a really thick base that mounts to the frame and the engine slides along there.

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Pretty sure Briggs recommends this one too.

The JTP, odenthal, and speed set motor mount by TDC are all very close in design intent. Personally I love the TDC Mount but certain chassis it doesn’t work ideally with - ones that have cross members along the frame rails.

The ultimate factor Comes down to your needs. One downside to the JTP is that in high grip situations, or times where you are at a bumpy track, medium or low ride height settings with the JTP will cause the clamps to scrape the track like crazy. The Odenthall and TDC designs prevent this scraping by having the clamps be further removed from the racing surface, so there is that factor to consider.

Also, there is lateral offset to consider. The JTP has the most offset settings, but the studs that it comes with are very hard to get out once set. So, if you have another chassis you want to use, it may not be the most ideal lateral offset. With the TDC, their studs for the mount are Equipped with a 4mm Allen head which makes adjusting the offset really nice. I’m not sure if the odenthal does this.

Regardless of which one you choose, they’re all really solid choices. If you do go the JTP route, however, make sure to have it Milled for chassis with a cross bar In the frame rails, even if your chassis doesn’t have a cross bar, some day you may want to use a chassis that does. Unlike cheaper mounts, all of these options are “buy it for life” kinda investments imo, so it makes sense to buy something that will work universally.

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I second Odenthal. I have not had a mount from them I did not like. It allows engine adjustment and removal without loosening frame clamps. Saves frame in the end. I have not tried JDC

Thanks for the advice!

I am mounting it on a otk 2 cycle so some offset is necessary. I am trying to offset it as little as possible but enough to where I can run the clutch inboard. Thanks for the advice.

Thanks for the advice! looking at all options!.

Thanks for the advice.

Euro chassis here. This was with my birel offset. As you can see I was able to move to the left another inch or so and still have plenty of room.

Thanks for the visual, I am trying to run the clutch inboard as well. so that I can run the engine more under the frame and balance the go kart better.

Important to realize that running clutch inboard or outboard doesn’t really change where the lateral offset is, as the end of the crankshaft will still be the same distance from the seat either way. Running inboard seems to be “in” lately, but all it really can affect is where you put the rear sprocket carrier.

I think we need a definition of inboard/ outboard

Is ’ inboard’ clutch sprocket next to crankcase, or clutch sprocket nearest c/l of kart? (engine on right of kart)

It is not necessarily the crank end position which is critical, turning the clutch round can alter lateral clearance at the drum o/d by 3/4 inch or more.

@d-i-y80 correct, yes on your definition - ‘inboard’ means closest to the crank case, ‘outboard’ is closest to center line of kart.

The end position of the crank is indeed crucial, as it can only move so far left (if viewed from rear of kart) before interfering with the right seat support or side of seat. Yes, you are also correct, swapping the orientation of the clutch allows you to adjust the sprocket hub on the axle, depending on your particular chassis, and where it needs to sit on the axle for proper chain alignment.

Thanks for the response. All points satisfactorily covered. Cheers!

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