Racing back after checkered flag when the race is over

safety

(Bryan Hall) #1

Why is it in karting, that nearly all drivers race back to the pits after the end of the race? In every other form of racing, post checked flag you slow and do a cool down lap. Yet in karting, I’ve had many near wrecks with crazy kart drives rushing back to the pits. They look at me like I’m doing something wrong. It’s not like they are pulling in to check tire temps or anything, as we have to wait in line for the scales.

What am I missing?


(TJ Koyen) #2

I never see this done? Sounds like a specific issue with the dudes you’re racing with.


(Bryan Williams ) #3

I have also seen this. I don’t slow a huge amount but I never understood the point of racing to the scales and putting any more hardship on my tires than necessary.


(Mike Clark) #4

In sprint karts - I see some make sure they don’t let off too soon - but that is just a turn or 2 after the checkered. Generally it’s time to start conserving your energy and concentrating on next heat.

In rental leagues sometimes the contest d’urination happens until pit entrance. Some of it is getting every penny worth out of the entry fee. I have to admit on the cool down lap is generally a time I try a little something different here or there. I had a second place finish in the final this Sunday, I could see first slowed drastically on his last lap. I am sure he was just making sure he didn’t blow it and took advantage of the ability to coast to the checkered. On the cool off lap I could see he was slowing to collect a piece of body work someone had lost. I blocked on that side for safety just in case. There were 2 guys in a previous session that I could see were battling even after braking for pit in should have been over with. We had some weird stuff happen on the start involving those 2, 1 setting too high a pace and 1 guy that had suffered a wasp sting in an earlier session. Wasn’t even a full moon.


(Eric Gunderson) #5

As TJ says I’ve rarely seen a crash after the checkered…

But, I think some of it is basic courtesy to other racers in other categories. If they all parades around at 10mph waving to the “crowd” while the corner workers do the color brigade with flags, you’re “that guy” that is slowing the whole show down on raceday.

Of course, there’s a massive gap between racing after the checkered and going that slow. Most experienced racers let off after the checkered and will run at 70-80% to bring their own heart rate down and cool off before the scales.

Personally, I always felt a reasonable sense of urgency to get off the track after the race. I never would drive over others to do so, but it felt like something unspoken that you shouldn’t daudle either.

Maybe it’s simply a cultural issue at tracks—-series not talking about it and it just gets out of hand?


(Andrew Maldonado) #6

Some people keep race pace to get all the data they possibly can with tire temps and pressures. Road racing cars this is normal. In HPDE there is a cool down lap. Some tuners/engineers ask their drivers to bring in the kart/car and race temps.


(TJ Koyen) #7

At USPKS and Route 66 it’s an automatic unsportsmanlike DQ if you wreck with someone after the flag.


(Emmanuel Baako) #8

If this is creating an issue, mention it to the race director to cover the courtesy required after the checker. The definition of “racing” may vary from one person to another.
One person might let off completely because they are exhausted, the other may just choose to drive at 8/10s and is extremely comfortable and relaxed at that speed.
Having your race director or officials step in and address that should help prevent this from becoming an issue.


(Paolo Nunzio Licary) #9

In road racing, IF i have clear area around me, ive used post race to try out some potential overtaking lines/entry speeds that were too high risk of losing time during the race. You dont get a ton of opportunities on hot race tires and race condition rubber buildup to do that without risking position. Free data essentially.


(Dom Callan) #10

I know this sounds kind of insane but I don’t actually trust the finish line flag. I usually feel like I need to keep going just in case. It takes force of will to lift off the pedal after the flag, for me.


(Marin Vujcich) #11

Have seen this heaps here on NZ, have done it myself when I want a tire pressure check or a hard engine cut entering pit shute for tuning.
Always curtious though.


(Christopher Foskey) #12

I do this and there are a couple of reasons. One is for testing as other have stated. The other reason that I do it, is because the primary tracks that I race on are over 2 miles in length. Just putting around back to the line could very well mean that the next race will be delayed longer than nescesary. I’m driving race pace back to the pits, but I’m not actually racing. If someone slow in front of me, I will usually slow down.


(James McMahon) #13

I think that’s reasonably fair as long as you cool it some as you get to the pits.