Got my Books!

Got my books :books: ! Ready to learn! I’m a noob so I can’t wait to apply what I learn!

Best,

-jd

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Noice! What ya starting with?

Hi @Bimodal_Rocket - I figured I’d start with Karting 101 - is that what you would suggest?

Best,

-jd

Yep. Terence’s book is for a bit further in.

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That’s awesome! Welcome to the sport.

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Thank you @KartingIsLife!

@LiveHappy welcome to karting! Looks like you’ve got a lot of reading there, let me know if you have questions!!

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@Eric_Gunderson - Thank you for reaching out - I started on 101 last night. Great read so far!

Live Happy!

-jd

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I’m thinking I should buy these!

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Best investment you’ll make honestly.

Hate to be “that guy” but there is no better investment than seat time. Nothing will beat hands on seat time. I bought some books earlier this year after being out of karting since i was 14 (now recently turned 30) and found them to be useless. What i learned as a kid was practice practice practice. The stop watch determines everything. I guess i was lucky as a kid to know more than i should but the books are nearly useless now, at least for what i read. Seat time wins all.

This is where I’d put a meme of the kid that says “why not both”

Seat time is only useful if you are improving. Turning lap after lap is only helpful up to a point.
Reading\leaning is only useful if you put it into practice and observe the results.

It’s the combination of the two that moves the needle. I think it’s a little different as a kid vs an adult too. But more than anything, people learn differently.

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Conversely, seat time is useless if you’re only practicing bad habits.

You probably had a good base from racing when you were younger, so you understood some fundamentals that a true “newb” wouldn’t have.

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Im sorry but you both basically are saying seat time is irreverent. Seat time is not only useful if you are improving. Seat time can show where you are not improving. You must turn laps to see where the readings/improvements can come from or not coming from. Its trial and error. My fathers dedication and mine werent for nothing. We broke track records strictly because of consistent weekends or even weekdays spent at the track. NOTHING beats seat time and thats because of the information you can gather each time you turn a lap. Im honestly shocked by your comments.

I was easily considered a true noob when i started but we worked our butts off in such a short time frame. There was no base to start from, we built our base on our own. I was the true “newb” who broke records with a pickup truck and one spare engine in under 2 years. The reason the happend? practice, practice, practice.

I don’t think that they are saying seat time is irrelevant. But one point TJ brings up is that seat time is worthless when practicing bad habits. Read up, learn, apply those techniques to your track. It helps new drivers especially. Eventually you’ll move more towards seat time than reading but I think each has its place. I think saying only do this or that to get better is horribly inaccurate. If seat time were the only way to get better there wouldn’t be a forum with people constantly asking questions.

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Comer80 club championship, and 2nd in NYS only because my chain broke on the final lap with two turns to go (i broke the track record that day) Worst pain i think i will ever feel.

Seat time only works if you can find the pros and cons of how you are managing your lap times. I am talking about before time sectors were even a factor with aim or who ever. Seat time is everything. It always has been. Nothing is more important than the clock.

People also peak. Sometimes you need your eyes opened to think differently and drive better,

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For most people, getting from A to B is easier with a map. The ones that can rely on intuition alone the the outliers.

Nobody in this topic has said that seat time isn’t important. Pretty sure we all agree that’s a given. Rather, the point being made is that are things that can augment it and the quality of that seat time is important.

It seems like what you’re saying is that your own personal experience is the only valid one. The reality is that people learn differently, have access to different resources and are at different development stages of their driving. It’s up to the individual to figure out what works for them in a given situation. What worked for you, worked for you and it’s great that you found something that worked really well…

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