Swift 125 Unlimited Superkart

enduro
roadracing

(James McMahon) #41

You, my friend, are going to :poop: yourself :laughing:


(Andre Molina) #42

Some really important bits are on the way from Northampton. I’m pretty nervous.

Meanwhile considering my soon to be destroyed bank account, my year long (or more) sabbatical from active karting is confirmed.

I’ll take the year to:

  • Build this operation right. Get the kart built and running, set up ancilliaries: Towing & trailer, kart stand, etc…
  • Get myself into non-circular shape so I won’t die.
  • Test this beast (if I am done before year’s end.)
  • Visit a few race events to familiarize with the culture and atmosphere.
  • Perhaps some arrive & drive if time allows.
  • Travel with the wife so she’s not too upset about the whole deal!

I’ll leave this post with a more revealing teaser:


(Andre Molina) #43

Had a little precipitated decision: If I am jumping off the deep end with this superkart shit, then I will REALLY jump off the deep end.

Ended up investing (?) in not one but TWO Rotax 256s. One of them was sourced from the pacific northwest, an OK condition set of cylinders, some nice heads, and a good looking crankcase:

image

The second one was sourced from the UK. Engine was complete, but the lad’s shed sprung a leak which judiciously dripped on the disassembled gearbox parts for many, many years. Results were a complete engine with junky gears.

Import costs were HIGH, but it made it in safe and sound thanks to the seller’s thorough packaging in a banana box:

In the mean time, sourced a box of random bits and pieces locally. Started sorting through them and comparing to the rusty UK stuff:

Crank and rods look really good and round, worth what I’ve paid for the engines by themselves:

The engines are similar looking, but inside completely different.

The UK engine has a later production code, holes in the crankcase for lightening, and bolt-on combustion chambers:

The west coast motor has built in head combustion chambers and a more robust (heavy) bottom end:

Test-fitting pipes in the west coast engine:

And the UK piece, which is likely what I’ll go with:

Looking forward to joining the division 1 superkart ranks, but this is one heck of a project.


(Andre Molina) #44

Well, been stuck in limbo with this project. I am in between houses right now, the superkart is still in my in-laws garage and now completely inaccessible, covered in boxes and moving stuff.

Regardless, this hiatus gave me time to think. I’ve come to realize I would rather stick with 125cc, KV92 power:

  • The engine is in excellent condition, I went through it and it’s ready to go. Needs nothing.
  • Spares are easier to find, and I have a brand new spare cylinder.
  • The original plan was for the kart to be as versatile as possible: I want to be able to hit sprint tracks, autocrosses, and road races. 250cc limits me to road races only.
  • I MAY have bit more then I can chew with that Rotax 256… The gearbox is very rusty, it will need everything.
  • Historically, it aligns better with the kart’s original purpose.

(Andre Molina) #45

I’ve just confirmed the kart’s lineage, it was indeed owned by Graham Barker. Graham set up the Swift chassis originally for Division 1 125cc racing. He built the KV92 engine with a modified liner & ignition.

Kart was purchased by John Musil (Musel?) in Canada. It was driven by Doug Cole ONCE, but I don’t think Cole owned it, I think it still belonged to Musil at that point. Finally, the whole setup was purchased by Stefan Buckley in WA and shipped across the border.

Really cool stuff.